(((((ASTRO )))))

"And finally, we are poor because we have lost our ethical moorings. We condone cronyism and corruption and we don’t ostracize or punish the crooks in our midst. Both cronyism and corruption are wasteful but we allow their practice because our loyalty is to family or friend, not to the larger good."


Why are Filipinos so Poor?
by Francisco Sionil José
National Artist Award for Literature, 2001


#FSionilJose View Larger

"And finally, we are poor because we have lost our ethical moorings. We condone cronyism and corruption and we don’t ostracize or punish the crooks in our midst. Both cronyism and corruption are wasteful but we allow their practice because our loyalty is to family or friend, not to the larger good."


Why are Filipinos so Poor?
by Francisco Sionil José
National Artist Award for Literature, 2001


#FSionilJose


"Grief turns out to be a place none of us know until we reach it. We anticipate (we know) that someone close to us could die, but we do not look beyond the few days or weeks that immediately follow such an imagined death. We misconstrue the nature of even those few days or weeks. We might expect if the death is sudden to feel shock. We do not expect the shock to be obliterative, dislocating to both body and mind. We might expect that we will be prostrate, inconsolable, crazy with loss. We do not expect to be literally crazy, cool customers who believe that their husband is about to return and need his shoes. In the version of grief we imagine, the model will be “healing.” A certain forward movement will prevail. The worst days will be the earliest days. We imagine that the moment to most severely test us will be the funeral, after which this hypothetical healing will take place. When we anticipate the funeral we wonder about failing to “get through it,” rise to the occasion, exhibit the “strength” that invariably gets mentioned as the correct response to death. We anticipate needing to steel ourselves the for the moment: will I be able to greet people, will I be able to leave the scene, will I be able even to get dressed that day? We have no way of knowing that this will not be the issue. We have no way of knowing that the funeral itself will be anodyne, a kind of narcotic regression in which we are wrapped in the care of others and the gravity and meaning of the occasion. Nor can we know ahead of the fact (and here lies the heart of the difference between grief as we imagine it and grief as it is) the unending absence that follows, the void, the very opposite of meaning, the relentless succession of moments during which we will confront the experience of meaninglessness itself."

Joan Didion
The Year of Magical Thinking
2005


#MH17 View Larger

"Grief turns out to be a place none of us know until we reach it. We anticipate (we know) that someone close to us could die, but we do not look beyond the few days or weeks that immediately follow such an imagined death. We misconstrue the nature of even those few days or weeks. We might expect if the death is sudden to feel shock. We do not expect the shock to be obliterative, dislocating to both body and mind. We might expect that we will be prostrate, inconsolable, crazy with loss. We do not expect to be literally crazy, cool customers who believe that their husband is about to return and need his shoes. In the version of grief we imagine, the model will be “healing.” A certain forward movement will prevail. The worst days will be the earliest days. We imagine that the moment to most severely test us will be the funeral, after which this hypothetical healing will take place. When we anticipate the funeral we wonder about failing to “get through it,” rise to the occasion, exhibit the “strength” that invariably gets mentioned as the correct response to death. We anticipate needing to steel ourselves the for the moment: will I be able to greet people, will I be able to leave the scene, will I be able even to get dressed that day? We have no way of knowing that this will not be the issue. We have no way of knowing that the funeral itself will be anodyne, a kind of narcotic regression in which we are wrapped in the care of others and the gravity and meaning of the occasion. Nor can we know ahead of the fact (and here lies the heart of the difference between grief as we imagine it and grief as it is) the unending absence that follows, the void, the very opposite of meaning, the relentless succession of moments during which we will confront the experience of meaninglessness itself."

Joan Didion
The Year of Magical Thinking
2005


#MH17


"In Western philosophy, the soul is the principle of life in man. Body is the matter, soul is the form. As long as body and soul are one unit, man is alive. Death is the separation of the soul from the body. Freed from the body, it ceases to experience thirst and hunger, cold and heat. As spirit, the soul is the opposite of the body which is matter."


The Soul Book
Demetrio / Fernando / Zialcilta
1991 View Larger

"In Western philosophy, the soul is the principle of life in man. Body is the matter, soul is the form. As long as body and soul are one unit, man is alive. Death is the separation of the soul from the body. Freed from the body, it ceases to experience thirst and hunger, cold and heat. As spirit, the soul is the opposite of the body which is matter."


The Soul Book
Demetrio / Fernando / Zialcilta
1991


"At 84, you can do anything you like and hope it will shock the panties out of some fuddy-duddy friends, but it never does."
 With the real superwoman, Gilda, sya talaga si Darna sa totoong buhay. Read more on her column “Forever 81” today at the Philippine Daily Inquirer and discover the secret of being forever wild and young at heart. Kahit ilang pilas pa ng kalendaryo ang dumaan, you will always be forever 81 or 18!
Thank you for capturing this photo kuya @patrickdeveyra
#forever81 #GildaCorderoFernando

http://lifestyle.inquirer.net/165743/forever-and-ever View Larger

"At 84, you can do anything you like and hope it will shock the panties out of some fuddy-duddy friends, but it never does."


With the real superwoman, Gilda, sya talaga si Darna sa totoong buhay. Read more on her column “Forever 81” today at the Philippine Daily Inquirer and discover the secret of being forever wild and young at heart. Kahit ilang pilas pa ng kalendaryo ang dumaan, you will always be forever 81 or 18!

Thank you for capturing this photo kuya @patrickdeveyra

#forever81 #GildaCorderoFernando

http://lifestyle.inquirer.net/165743/forever-and-ever


thank you to all who came to see the opening last night. 
it was all worth the puyat nights over countless cups of coffee.

day off muna ako today, cut again tomorrow… (at Silverlens Galleries) View Larger

thank you to all who came to see the opening last night.
it was all worth the puyat nights over countless cups of coffee.

day off muna ako today, cut again tomorrow… (at Silverlens Galleries)


“The world is so empty if one thinks only of mountains, rivers and cities; but to know someone who thinks and feels with us, and who, though distant, is close to us in spirit, this makes the earth for us an inhabited garden.” 

― Johann Wolfgang von Goethe


Isles series
18 x 26 cm
2014

#art #artph View Larger

“The world is so empty if one thinks only of mountains, rivers and cities; but to know someone who thinks and feels with us, and who, though distant, is close to us in spirit, this makes the earth for us an inhabited garden.”

― Johann Wolfgang von Goethe


Isles series
18 x 26 cm
2014

#art #artph