(((((ASTRO )))))

The Spaniards must have known that their claim to superiority was rather shaky. So before their new position as conquistador could be questioned, (they could not possibly kill ALL the people) they resorted, like all bullies, to put down.

They called the natives names — “indio” (translate that to “uncivilized heathen”) and “Juan Tamad” — lazy, irresponsible, hippie. Juan Tamad, the story goes, being too lazy to climb, sat under the guava tree waiting for the fruit to fall.

The pre-colonial laid-back Filipinos may have given the Spaniards the idea that they were easygoing. Nature after all, was bountiful. Their subsistence did not demand much work.

But it was to the interest of the colonizer to have hard-working and docile subjects. They had to produce, without too many complaints, the surplus needed to support the colonial administration and the queen’s coffers. So laziness was castigated. Otherwise, it would be impossible to imagine how people who held the siesta sacred could call anybody else lazy.

The History of the Burgis
1987

image: “Asta” • paper • 2010

#politik View Larger

The Spaniards must have known that their claim to superiority was rather shaky. So before their new position as conquistador could be questioned, (they could not possibly kill ALL the people) they resorted, like all bullies, to put down.

They called the natives names — “indio” (translate that to “uncivilized heathen”) and “Juan Tamad” — lazy, irresponsible, hippie. Juan Tamad, the story goes, being too lazy to climb, sat under the guava tree waiting for the fruit to fall.

The pre-colonial laid-back Filipinos may have given the Spaniards the idea that they were easygoing. Nature after all, was bountiful. Their subsistence did not demand much work.

But it was to the interest of the colonizer to have hard-working and docile subjects. They had to produce, without too many complaints, the surplus needed to support the colonial administration and the queen’s coffers. So laziness was castigated. Otherwise, it would be impossible to imagine how people who held the siesta sacred could call anybody else lazy.

The History of the Burgis
1987

image: “Asta” • paper • 2010

#politik


lagi kong niloloko si inay, ang aking lola tuwing binibisita ko sya. naalala ko kasi nung halos hangang baywang nya pa lang ako na sabay kaming nangunguha at pumipitas ng mga bunga ng kape sa likod ng bahay namin sa probinsya (doon din ako madalas naglalaro at ginagawa kong monkey bar ang mga sanga ng puno ng kape) ibibilad nya ang mga bunga, gigilingin at ilalaga (di pa uso ang venti o grande at dalawang magkaibang salita pa ang star at bucks) 

ang yelo nga noon sabi nya ay nakukuha lamang sa frigidaire o kaya nabibili sa tindahan at ginagawang ice candy o nilalagay sa halo-halo. ngayon, yelo na ang napapalibot sa likod ng bahay, at ang kape naman ang binibili sa tindahan. 

kaya pag binibisita ko sya, lagi kong biro “nay, ano ba ang lasa ng yelo? yung hindi galing sa ref, ‘di nabibili sa tindahan at pumapatak galing sa langit?” View Larger

lagi kong niloloko si inay, ang aking lola tuwing binibisita ko sya. naalala ko kasi nung halos hangang baywang nya pa lang ako na sabay kaming nangunguha at pumipitas ng mga bunga ng kape sa likod ng bahay namin sa probinsya (doon din ako madalas naglalaro at ginagawa kong monkey bar ang mga sanga ng puno ng kape) ibibilad nya ang mga bunga, gigilingin at ilalaga (di pa uso ang venti o grande at dalawang magkaibang salita pa ang star at bucks)

ang yelo nga noon sabi nya ay nakukuha lamang sa frigidaire o kaya nabibili sa tindahan at ginagawang ice candy o nilalagay sa halo-halo. ngayon, yelo na ang napapalibot sa likod ng bahay, at ang kape naman ang binibili sa tindahan.

kaya pag binibisita ko sya, lagi kong biro “nay, ano ba ang lasa ng yelo? yung hindi galing sa ref, ‘di nabibili sa tindahan at pumapatak galing sa langit?”


"And finally, we are poor because we have lost our ethical moorings. We condone cronyism and corruption and we don’t ostracize or punish the crooks in our midst. Both cronyism and corruption are wasteful but we allow their practice because our loyalty is to family or friend, not to the larger good."


Why are Filipinos so Poor?
by Francisco Sionil José
National Artist Award for Literature, 2001


#FSionilJose View Larger

"And finally, we are poor because we have lost our ethical moorings. We condone cronyism and corruption and we don’t ostracize or punish the crooks in our midst. Both cronyism and corruption are wasteful but we allow their practice because our loyalty is to family or friend, not to the larger good."


Why are Filipinos so Poor?
by Francisco Sionil José
National Artist Award for Literature, 2001


#FSionilJose


"Grief turns out to be a place none of us know until we reach it. We anticipate (we know) that someone close to us could die, but we do not look beyond the few days or weeks that immediately follow such an imagined death. We misconstrue the nature of even those few days or weeks. We might expect if the death is sudden to feel shock. We do not expect the shock to be obliterative, dislocating to both body and mind. We might expect that we will be prostrate, inconsolable, crazy with loss. We do not expect to be literally crazy, cool customers who believe that their husband is about to return and need his shoes. In the version of grief we imagine, the model will be “healing.” A certain forward movement will prevail. The worst days will be the earliest days. We imagine that the moment to most severely test us will be the funeral, after which this hypothetical healing will take place. When we anticipate the funeral we wonder about failing to “get through it,” rise to the occasion, exhibit the “strength” that invariably gets mentioned as the correct response to death. We anticipate needing to steel ourselves the for the moment: will I be able to greet people, will I be able to leave the scene, will I be able even to get dressed that day? We have no way of knowing that this will not be the issue. We have no way of knowing that the funeral itself will be anodyne, a kind of narcotic regression in which we are wrapped in the care of others and the gravity and meaning of the occasion. Nor can we know ahead of the fact (and here lies the heart of the difference between grief as we imagine it and grief as it is) the unending absence that follows, the void, the very opposite of meaning, the relentless succession of moments during which we will confront the experience of meaninglessness itself."

Joan Didion
The Year of Magical Thinking
2005


#MH17 View Larger

"Grief turns out to be a place none of us know until we reach it. We anticipate (we know) that someone close to us could die, but we do not look beyond the few days or weeks that immediately follow such an imagined death. We misconstrue the nature of even those few days or weeks. We might expect if the death is sudden to feel shock. We do not expect the shock to be obliterative, dislocating to both body and mind. We might expect that we will be prostrate, inconsolable, crazy with loss. We do not expect to be literally crazy, cool customers who believe that their husband is about to return and need his shoes. In the version of grief we imagine, the model will be “healing.” A certain forward movement will prevail. The worst days will be the earliest days. We imagine that the moment to most severely test us will be the funeral, after which this hypothetical healing will take place. When we anticipate the funeral we wonder about failing to “get through it,” rise to the occasion, exhibit the “strength” that invariably gets mentioned as the correct response to death. We anticipate needing to steel ourselves the for the moment: will I be able to greet people, will I be able to leave the scene, will I be able even to get dressed that day? We have no way of knowing that this will not be the issue. We have no way of knowing that the funeral itself will be anodyne, a kind of narcotic regression in which we are wrapped in the care of others and the gravity and meaning of the occasion. Nor can we know ahead of the fact (and here lies the heart of the difference between grief as we imagine it and grief as it is) the unending absence that follows, the void, the very opposite of meaning, the relentless succession of moments during which we will confront the experience of meaninglessness itself."

Joan Didion
The Year of Magical Thinking
2005


#MH17


"In Western philosophy, the soul is the principle of life in man. Body is the matter, soul is the form. As long as body and soul are one unit, man is alive. Death is the separation of the soul from the body. Freed from the body, it ceases to experience thirst and hunger, cold and heat. As spirit, the soul is the opposite of the body which is matter."


The Soul Book
Demetrio / Fernando / Zialcilta
1991 View Larger

"In Western philosophy, the soul is the principle of life in man. Body is the matter, soul is the form. As long as body and soul are one unit, man is alive. Death is the separation of the soul from the body. Freed from the body, it ceases to experience thirst and hunger, cold and heat. As spirit, the soul is the opposite of the body which is matter."


The Soul Book
Demetrio / Fernando / Zialcilta
1991